Bomber Command Books
Bomber Command Books 

Welcome to Bomber Command Books

Bomber Command Books is the sales site for Mention the War Publications. We specialise in publishing and selling books about RAF Bomber Command in the Second World War and related topics. Our growing list of titles focuses on the aircraft, squadrons and above all the men and women who shaped the legend that endures to this day.

 

The intention of Mention the War Publications is to help preserve the memory of the 55,573 members of Bomber Command who gave their lives for our freedom and their more fortunate comrades who survived the ordeal. We aim to ensure that succeeding generations can learn about their feats of heroism which were on an unparalleled scale.  The least we can do is perpetuate the story of what they achieved and how they did it.

 

Browse our online bookstore, read their stories and remember them...

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Top Pick

 

75 (NZ) Squadron Profile

by Chris Ward and Chris Newey

 

Chris Ward’s Profile of 75(NZ) Squadron is the long-awaited, definitive and comprehensive wartime account of this well-known and highly-regarded Bomber Command outfit. Produced with the full support and assistance of squadron veterans, the Royal New Zealand Air Force Association and the New Zealand Bomber Command Association, it is a testament to the duty and sacrifice of all those who served with this famous unit throughout the Second World War. Chris Ward’s detailed narrative, based on the squadron’s Second World War Operations Record Book, is complemented by several hundred photographs, many published for the first time.
In 1938, the New Zealand government had ordered thirty Vickers Wellington Mk1 bombers. RNZAF aircrew were despatched to train on the new aircraft at RAF Marham, and then take them to their new home in the Southern Hemisphere. When war broke out, the New Zealand Government placed the aircraft and their crews at the disposal of the RAF to help fight the new enemy. Already known as ‘The New Zealand Squadron’, the unit was given the number 75 on 4 April 1940, the previous unit so numbered having been disbanded. This meant that the original nucleus of personnel remained together as an operational unit of the RAF.
On 4 April 1940, The New Zealand Squadron was renamed 75(NZ) Squadron. Although often referred to as an RNZAF unit, it was wholly equipped and controlled by the RAF until the end of the conflict. It was a key component of No. 3 Group, Bomber Command, and was based initially at RAF Feltwell, then RAF Mildenhall, RAF Newmarket and RAF Mepal, in Cambridgeshire. The unit saw action over France, Norway, Belgium, Italy, Sweden and Germany, distinguishing itself in the process.
The squadron operated with a strength of three Flights after receiving Short Stirling bombers. In line with the rest of No. 3 Group, the squadron re-equipped with the Avro Lancaster in 1944, the type seeing the unit through to August 1945.
75(NZ) Sqn operated against the Germans from 1940 to VE Day, flying more sorties than any other allied heavy bomber squadron, suffering the second highest number of casualties. A Victoria Cross was awarded to Sgt J A Ward for climbing out onto the wing of his Wellington on an operation over Europe, in an attempt to put out an engine fire. Although badly damaged by enemy fighters’ cannon shells, the aircraft managed to return to its base.

8.5 in x 11 in format, 477 pages, £20.00 / US$ 25.00

 

New from Bomber Command Books

 

Lancaster Bale Out

by Clive Smith

 

Reworked and updated, Clive Smith’s story of his second cousin, Jack Hougham, is available through Amazon worldwide for the first time. Jack was shot down and killed in a 106 Squadron Lancaster in 1943. Growing up, Clive was always fascinated by Jack's logbook, letters from the Air Ministry and photos of him in his flying gear.  No one in his family however seemed to know exactly what had happened to him.  Twenty-five years ago, Clive decided to try and find out more and so begun a lengthy search for information across the UK, Europe and North America that has resulted in this book.
 
Fred Smooker grew up near Durham and left school in 1930 at the age of 14.  He followed his Father into Coal Mining, but at the age of 17 decided to further his education and begun studying for a senior mining qualification.  Mid way through his exams in 1941, Britain had been at war for 18 months and things were going badly for the Allies.  Fred came to the decision that 'aircrew were more important than coal miners' so he volunteered to join the RAF.  After being accepted he was called up in June of that year, and 20 months later found himself flying operations over Germany as a Bomb Aimer, flying in Lancasters with 106 Squadron based at RAF Syerston.
 
The events that followed during the next 2 years would live with him for the rest of his life.  Fred passed away aged 91 in 2008. He had outlived the rest of his crew by more than 64 years and for his whole life had lived with the question, “Why me?”

 

9 in x 6 in format, 332 pages. £13.00

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